Hollosi Information eXchange /HIX/
HIX MOZAIK 358
Copyright (C) HIX
1994-11-27
Új cikk beküldése (a cikk tartalma az író felelőssége)
Megrendelés Lemondás
1 VoA - Bosznia/Konyvtar; CEFTA talalkozo (2 cikk) (mind)  130 sor     (cikkei)

+ - VoA - Bosznia/Konyvtar; CEFTA talalkozo (2 cikk) (mind) VÁLASZ  Feladó: (cikkei)

date=11/25/94
type=correspondent report
number=2-169867
title=Bosnia / Library
byline=Alena Kenclova (not voiced)
dateline=Prague
content=
voiced at:   (not  voiced)

Intro:  Librarians from Europe and the United States are meeting
in the Czech Republic (Friday and Saturday) to restore the
destroyed University of Sarajevo.  Alena Kenclova reports from
Prague.

Text:  The National and University Library of Bosnia-Herzegovina
in Sarajevo was destroyed by artillery bombardment in August of
1992.  Precious collections of books, periodicals and  archival
material perished in the fire.  The central catalog and an
irreplaceable collection of journals published since the middle
of the 19th century were also lost.

Experts from several countries are now trying at the meeting in
Prague to define what they call "Bosniaca" (boz-nya-kah),  which
means library material printed in and about Bosnia-Herzegovina.
The next step would be to locate the material outside the country
and use it to reconstruct the original Sarajevo collections.

The project is run by UNESCO.  Its officials assume that the
"Bosniaca" definition should be available by the end of the year.

The director of the National and University Library in Sarajevo,
Enes Kujundzic (koo-yoon-jich), said at the Prague meeting the
definition will  not  be easy for many reasons.  For instance the
collections contained materials in many languages.  There were
manuscripts in Latin, Church Slavonic, Arabic, Hebrew and the
languages of the former Yugoslavia.  The collections included
books in many other languages as well.  Book printing spread in
Bosnia-Herzegovina in the 19th century.

Mr.Kujundzic expects that the largest sources for restoring the
Sarajevo collections will be found in Austria, Hungary, Italy,
Russia, and western Europe, as well as the Czech Republic and
Turkey.  Directors and leading officials from the National
Libraries of most of these countries are attending the Prague
meeting.

Igor Blazevic from Bosnia, who is helping Czech aid programs,
said that the reconstruction of the library is highly important
to maintain the thousand-year-old cultural tradition of
Bosnia-Herzegovina.  But he cautioned that the effort should be
adapted to the real situation in Sarajevo and  not  be
discouraged if the reconstruction is delayed by the war. (Signed)

neb/ak/jwh/mmk
25-Nov-94 12:43 pm est (1743 utc)
nnnn

source: Voice of America

****************************************************************

date=11/25/94
type=correspondent report
number=2-169868
title=Central Europe Econ (l only)
byline=Barry Wood
dateline=Prague
content=
voiced at:

Intro:  Prime ministers of four Central European countries met
Friday in Poznan, Poland, to discuss ways to expand economic
cooperation.  V-o-A's Barry Wood reports.

Text:  The meeting was among signatory nations to the Central
Europe Free Trade Area (CEFTA).  The organization was set up two
years ago by Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia.

Czech prime minister Vaclav Klaus proclaimed the meeting a
success, saying the leaders want to expand and accelerate
economic cooperation.

Slovenia was an observer at the Friday meeting and will be
admitted once it has concluded free trade agreements with all
CEFTA countries.  So far, Slovenia has a free trade accord only
with Poland.

Mr. Klaus says Romania has also expressed interest in joining.
The Czech official says membership is open to all regional
economies committed to free trade.

The first round of mutual tariff cuts were to have come into
effect last March.  But as in western Europe, agriculture is
proving to be a problem area.  Hungary and Poland have recently
restricted some agricultural imports from CEFTA nations. These
moves were condemned Friday by the Czech and Slovak prime
ministers.

Prime minister Klaus says he does  not  want CEFTA to expand its
work into non-economic areas.  And he says he turned aside a
proposed statement that would have asked the European Union
commission to include CEFTA leaders at their summit meeting in
Germany next month.

All CEFTA nations are eager to join the European Union.  Mr.
Klaus says the CEFTA nations should await an invitation to E-U
meetings, rather than inviting themselves.  (Signed)

neb/bdw/jwh/mmk

25-Nov-94 1:00 pm est (1800 utc)
nnnn

source: Voice of America

*****************************************************************
A tovabbterjesztest a New York-i szekhelyu Magyar Emberi Jogok
Alapitvany tamogatja.

           [*]   [*]  [*]   [*]  [*][*]    [*][*][*]
           [*]   [*]  [*]   [*]  [*]  [*]  [*]
           [*][*][*]  [*][*][*]  [*][*]    [*][*] 
           [*]   [*]  [*]   [*]  [*]  [*]  [*]    
           [*]   [*]  [*]   [*]  [*]   [*] [*]

Reposting is supported by Hungarian Human Rights Foundation News
and Information Service.
*****************************************************************



AGYKONTROLL ALLAT AUTO AZSIA BUDAPEST CODER DOSZ FELVIDEK FILM FILOZOFIA FORUM GURU HANG HIPHOP HIRDETES HIRMONDO HIXDVD HUDOM HUNGARY JATEK KEP KONYHA KONYV KORNYESZ KUKKER KULTURA LINUX MAGELLAN MAHAL MOBIL MOKA MOZAIK NARANCS NARANCS1 NY NYELV OTTHON OTTHONKA PARA RANDI REJTVENY SCM SPORT SZABAD SZALON TANC TIPP TUDOMANY UK UTAZAS UTLEVEL VITA WEBMESTER WINDOWS