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1996-01-22
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1 VoA - Kelet-Europa/piacok (mind)  44 sor     (cikkei)
2 VoA - Kelet-Europa/befektetesek (mind)  77 sor     (cikkei)

+ - VoA - Kelet-Europa/piacok (mind) VÁLASZ  Feladó: (cikkei)

date=1/19/96
type=correspondent report
number=2-191506
title=East Euro Markets (s only)
byline=Barry Wood
dateline=prague
content=
voiced at:

Intro:  Eastern Europe's biggest stock markets, Prague and
Warsaw, fell back this week, losing some of the big gains of
earlier this month.  V-o-A's Barry Wood has this look at the
eastern markets.

Text:  There was profit taking in Prague as the p-x 50 index lost
three points on the week to close at 446.  Analysts say the
biggest companies -- the phone company, the energy company, and
Komercni Banka -- may now be overvalued.

In Warsaw the market retreated on the deepening political
problems imperiling the prime minister, who is accused of having
spied for Moscow in the 1980's.  The prospect of a new government
or early elections dampened interest in stocks.  The WIG (Warsaw
market) index lost two-and-one-half percent on the week, closing
at 87-hundred-13.

Budapest, however, continued to show gains, climbing to record
highs.  Analysts say investors are cheered  not  only by  good
corporate profits but new optimism about the Hungarian economy.
The B-U-X (Budapest market) index gained 50 points, or three
percent.

On the smaller exchanges, Bratislava registered big gains with
the market index up five percent.  Ljubljana gained
one-and-one-half percent.  The Croatian market was higher, the
Bulgarian market was mixed, and Bucharest was active.  (Signed)

neb/bdw/jwh/cf

19-Jan-96 1:17 pm est (1817 utc)
nnnn

source: Voice of America

+ - VoA - Kelet-Europa/befektetesek (mind) VÁLASZ  Feladó: (cikkei)

date=1/19/96
type=correspondent report
number=2-191499
title=East Euro Investment (l only)
byline=Barry Wood
dateline=Prague
content=
voiced at:

Intro: Direct foreign investment in the three fastest reforming
economies of East Europe rose last year by 43-percent.  V-o-A's
Barry Wood reports that Poland, the Czech Republic, and  Hungary
are thus widening their lead over the region's other
post-communist economies.

Text:   Nineteen-ninety-five saw record flows of foreign
investment into Poland and the Czech Republic.  Each country
attracted more than two-point-four billion dollars.

In the Czech Republic -- a much smaller economy than neighboring
Poland --the biggest inflow came from a Dutch-Swiss
telecommunications consortium which paid one-point-four billion
dollars for a 27-percent share in the Czech phone  company.  In
Poland, by far Eastern Europe's biggest economy, there were
hundreds of smaller investments -- many from German firms -- into
the industrial and service sectors.

In Hungary, the early leader in foreign investment, money
continued to flow in this past year.  One of the biggest inflows
came from (telecommunications companies) Deutsche Telcom and
Ameritech, which paid for a previously purchased share of the
Hungarian phone company.

Overall, the three top regional economies have attracted more
than 21-billion dollars of direct investment since 1990.  Hungary
continues to occupy the top spot, accounting for almost
ten-billion dollars, or about one-third of all investments in
Eastern Europe excluding the former Soviet Union.  Poland, which
has been gaining fast, is second with just under six-billion
dollars.  And the Czech Republic is third with five-point-six
billion dollars.

// Opt // Romania, after Poland the region's most populous
country, has been a laggard but there are signs of a turnaround.
Foreign investment in Romania has reached one-point-five-billion
dollars. // End opt //

The former Yugoslav Republics have thus far attracted little
interest from foreign companies.

// Opt // Slovakia, strategically placed next to Austria and
Hungary, is also a laggard.  Slovakia has thus far attracted only
600-million dollars of foreign investment. // End opt //

The Three Baltic Republics have a mixed record.  // Opt // The
best results are in Estonia, where nearly one-half-billion
dollars of mostly Swedish and Finnish money has been invested.
Experts say this is a very high figure considering that Estonia
has only one-and-one-half million people.  Latvia has attracted
less than 200-million dollars.  And Lithuania, the most populous
Baltic State, has attracted 300-million. // End opt //

                      //  rest optional  //

(And) Russia has recently done very well in attracting the big
muliti-national corporations.  Eager to tap a huge domestic
market and invest in the rich minerals and energy sector, foreign
direct investment in Russia has steadily climbed and now exceeds
four-point-eight-billion dollars.   (Signed)

neb/bdw/jwh

19-Jan-96 10:58 am est (1558 utc)
nnnn

source: Voice of America


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